Cross-curricular computing


Our Winter Computing Conference is coming up on Tuesday 6th December, our theme is cross- curricular computing. Computing is full of cross-curricular ideas, like perseverance, problem solving and creativity. We also think that computing makes most sense when it is in context. Other subject areas can give this context.

Each workshop at the conference will focus on a different curriculum area and we will show lots of practical examples of cross-curricular activities.

There are still a few places left, email kmorrison@londonclc.org.uk to book. Free for SLA schools and £95 outside of the SLA.

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London Connected Learning Centre

Primary computing conference

9am – 3.30pm, Tuesday 6th December

London Connected Learning Centre, SW4 0EL

Theme: Cross-curricular computing

Computing is full of cross-curricular ideas, like perseverance, problem solving and creativity. We also think that computing makes most sense when it is in context. Other subject areas can give this context.

Each workshop at the conference will focus on a different curriculum area. We will show lots of practical examples of cross-curricular activities.

Workshop descriptions

Workshop set 1

 

  • Computing and English
    The technology can inspire young people to read and write. We will show how schools are using digital platforms, like class blogs,  to celebrate reading. We will look at how pupils can use digital media to explore narrative and how digital writing can be used to help children engage with different mediums, like poetry. We also use VR headsets to see how this emerging technology can capture the imagination.
  • Computing and DT with electronics
    In this session we will show how the design cycle (design, make, and evaluate) can be used in practical technology projects. We will use simple 3D design tools, and link our creations to electronic components, like LEDs , to create programmable objects.

 

Workshop set 2 

 

  • Computing and science (data)
    Big data drives modern scientific discovery. We will show how primary pupils can gather data with data loggers and practise data handling using graphing tools and branching databases. Understanding data is also a key part of pupil’s digital literacy. Pupils must be able to read data to understand changes in the world.
  • Computing and music
    Computing and music both explore patterns. In music we annotate scores, whilst in computing we code algorithms.  This session  will show how all pupils can use technology to compose music, using tools like Soundtrap, Isle of Tunes, and Mad Pad. We also look at how music can shape other digital work, like using music in films and computer games.

 

Workshop set 3 

 

  • Computing and maths
    Computers can make abstract mathematical ideas concrete, by giving children examples of how these ideas work in practice. This session will show a range of resources teachers can use to make these links. We will look at specific examples of that relate to geometry and number for all ages of primary pupils.

 

Computing and art
The divide between art and computing is a myth. Fine artists are increasingly exploring digital media, fashion designers are generating digital fabric prints, and theatre directors are using video content. This session explores the links between art and computing and provides practical examples of how this can be done in class.

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